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At Empire's EdgeExploring Rome`s Egyptian Frontier$
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Robert B. Jackson

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780300088564

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300088564.001.0001

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Desert Trade Routes

Desert Trade Routes

Chapter:
(p.95) V Desert Trade Routes
Source:
At Empire's Edge
Author(s):

Robert B. Jackson

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300088564.003.0006

This chapter discusses how four major Roman roads crossed the Eastern Desert to link the Red Sea with the Nile Valley, and carried the wealth of India and Africa from Red Sea ports to the great emporium at Coptos. The exact course of the Via Hadriana was unmapped until June 1996, when two American researchers succeeded in tracing its route from the Nile Valley to the Red Sea coast. Long before the arrival of the Romans and for centuries after their departure, the scenic Myos Hormos Road between the Red Sea and the Nile served as a vital artery through the Eastern Desert. Researchers began examining the Marsa Nakkari–Edfu route only recently, and little definitive information is available. Although the existence of the Berenike–Coptos road has been known to modern scholars for many years, it has only recently been thoroughly explored and surveyed.

Keywords:   Roman roads, Eastern Desert, Red Sea, Nile Valley, Via Hadriana, Myos Hormos Road, Marsa Nakkari, Berenike

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