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Archaeology at La IsabelaAmerica's First European Town$
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Kathleen Deagan and Jose Maria Cruxent

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780300090413

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300090413.001.0001

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Taínos at La Isabela

Taínos at La Isabela

Chapter:
(p.15) 2 Taínos at La Isabela
Source:
Archaeology at La Isabela
Author(s):

Kathleen Deagan

José María Cruxent

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300090413.003.0002

This chapter discusses the different aspects of Taínos at La Isabela. The Caribbean that Columbus encountered was the domain of indigenous societies who had been there for centuries. The largest of these in the Greater Antilles were the Taínos, and neither the Taínos nor the Spaniards were completely ignorant of each other when La Isabela was established. There is a great deal of ethnohistorical and archaeological information available concerning the Taíno from a European perspective. There were several Taíno towns within a few miles of La Isabela, and both Columbus and Chanca noted that the Indians were constantly coming and going in the Spanish settlement, bartering gold and foodstuffs for bits of glass, metal, and trinkets. The disease brought unwittingly by the Spaniards to Hispaniola irrevocably devastated the Native American inhabitants.

Keywords:   La Isabela, Taínos, Spaniards, Columbus, Hispaniola

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