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A Portrait of Mendelssohn$
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Clive Brown

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780300095395

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300095395.001.0001

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• The Genesis of the Leipzig Conservatorium

• The Genesis of the Leipzig Conservatorium

Chapter:
20 • The Genesis of the Leipzig Conservatorium
Source:
A Portrait of Mendelssohn
Author(s):

Clive Brown

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300095395.003.0020

Heinrich Blümner, a Leipzig lawyer who died on February 13, 1839, left a bequest of 20,000 thalers for “the founding of a new, or the support of an existing all-purpose national institution for the arts or science.” The bequest was to be disposed of by the king of Saxony, who was petitioned by Felix Mendelssohn through his minister Baron Johann Paul von Falkenstein, to use the money for a music school. Mendelssohn argued that such a school would allow gifted young musicians from poor backgrounds to obtain training. Although the king was in favor of the suggestion, it took another three years for the plan to become a reality. Blümner's vision came in the form of the Leipzig Conservatorium.

Keywords:   music school, Heinrich Blümner, bequest, Johann Paul von Falkenstein, Leipzig Conservatorium

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