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After the FiresThe Ecology of Change in Yellowstone National Park$
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Linda L. Wallace

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780300100488

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300100488.001.0001

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Fire Patterns and Ungulate Survival in Northern Yellowstone Park: The Results of Two Independent Models

Fire Patterns and Ungulate Survival in Northern Yellowstone Park: The Results of Two Independent Models

Chapter:
(p.299) Chapter 13 Fire Patterns and Ungulate Survival in Northern Yellowstone Park: The Results of Two Independent Models
Source:
After the Fires
Author(s):

Linda L. Wallace

Michael B. Coughenour

Monica G. Turner

William H. Romme

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300100488.003.0013

This chapter presents the results of two independent models of fire patterns and ungulate survival in the northern part of Yellowstone National Park. Yellowstone National Park is renowned for its natural beauty. The original park boundaries were established to contain the geyser basins and hot springs, but they were later altered to include more of the ecosystem, such as watersheds and vegetational communities, within natural boundaries. The landscape carrying capacity model is a spatially explicit forage-based carrying capacity model, consisting of linked models of forage production, snow cover, Elk forage intake, dietary mixing, and Elk energy and nitrogen. The model estimates forage biomass based on typical values for a vegetation cover type and the previous year's precipitation. The results are integrated over space and time to derive a season-long estimate of Elk-days that can be supported by the landscape in a given winter.

Keywords:   Yellowstone National Park, fire patterns, vegetation, watershed, forage biomass

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