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After the FiresThe Ecology of Change in Yellowstone National Park$
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Linda L. Wallace

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780300100488

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300100488.001.0001

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Postglacial Fire, Vegetation, and Climate History of the Yellowstone-Lamar and Central Plateau Provinces, Yellowstone National Park

Postglacial Fire, Vegetation, and Climate History of the Yellowstone-Lamar and Central Plateau Provinces, Yellowstone National Park

Chapter:
(p.10) Chapter 2 Postglacial Fire, Vegetation, and Climate History of the Yellowstone-Lamar and Central Plateau Provinces, Yellowstone National Park
Source:
After the Fires
Author(s):

Sarah H. Millspaugh

Cathy Whitlock

Patrick J. Bartlein

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300100488.003.0002

This chapter describes different aspects of the postglacial fire, vegetation, and climate history of the Yellowstone-Lamar and central plateau provinces, Yellowstone National Park (YNP). The fires of 1988 were unique in the history of YNP, because during that summer a relatively small number of fires occurred over an enormous region. Paleo-environmental data from the northern and central Rocky Mountains suggest that the contrast between summer-wet and summer-dry precipitation regimes was greater during periods of higher-than-present insolation. The sediments of Yellowstone's lakes provide an opportunity to reconstruct the vegetation and fire history of the region back to the time of late-Pleistocene deglaciation. Stratigraphic pollen records provide information on changing forest composition. Studies in YNP indicate that large particles of charcoal are not transported far from their sources and offer information on local fire history.

Keywords:   Yellowstone National Park, paleo-environmental data, summer-dry precipitations, vegetation, insolation

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