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The Kings and Their HawksFalconry in Medieval England$
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Robin S. Oggins

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780300100587

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300100587.001.0001

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The Birds, Their Training, and the Sport of Falconry

The Birds, Their Training, and the Sport of Falconry

Chapter:
(p.10) 2 The Birds, Their Training, and the Sport of Falconry
Source:
The Kings and Their Hawks
Author(s):

Robin S. Oggins

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300100587.003.0002

This chapter discusses the birds, their training, and the sport of falconry in England. Many kinds of birds of prey have been trained and used in sport, but relatively few of these were used by English kings. The basic physical difference between falcons and hawks lies in the length and shape of their wings and tails. Falcons have narrow pointed wings and narrow, tapering tails. The chivalric sparrowhawk was considered the truer representative of a noble sport, and appears as a prize for valor on a number of occasions. The method by which a falcon was taught to fly at herons was similar to that by which she was trained to fly at cranes, but instead of flying the falcon at a hare-train and hares, the heron falcon was ordinarily flown at small birds.

Keywords:   falconry, birds, kings, wings

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