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Kabbalah in Italy, 1280-1510A Survey$
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Moshe Idel

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780300126266

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300126266.001.0001

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Menahem Recanati as a Theosophical-Theurgical Kabbalist

Menahem Recanati as a Theosophical-Theurgical Kabbalist

Chapter:
(p.117) 9 Menahem Recanati as a Theosophical-Theurgical Kabbalist
Source:
Kabbalah in Italy, 1280-1510
Author(s):

Moshe Idel

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300126266.003.0010

This chapter shows that, despite the dominance of the theosophical-theurgical model of Kabbalah in Spain from the time of its emergence under the impact of Provencal traditions brought there by R. Yitzhaq Sagi Nahor during the early thirteenth century, the actual sources of theurgy and theosophy are much earlier, occurring not only in Provencal and Ashkenazi sources but in rabbinic ones as well. However, it should not be assumed that theurgy and theosophy always occur together in these earlier sources. In some cases it is possible to find theosophical discussions without theurgical implication. A theosophical concept of the sefirot appears as early as the tenth century in the widely influential Commentary on Sefer Yezirah by R. Sabbatai Donnolo, an Italian Jew.

Keywords:   theosophical-theurgical model, Provencal traditions, R. Yitzhaq Sagi Nahor, Ashkenazi sources, R. Sabbatai Donnolo

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