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Kabbalah in Italy, 1280-1510A Survey$
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Moshe Idel

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780300126266

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300126266.001.0001

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The Trajectory of Eastern Kabbalah and Its Reverberations in Italy

The Trajectory of Eastern Kabbalah and Its Reverberations in Italy

Chapter:
(p.287) 22 The Trajectory of Eastern Kabbalah and Its Reverberations in Italy
Source:
Kabbalah in Italy, 1280-1510
Author(s):

Moshe Idel

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300126266.003.0023

This chapter discusses a trajectory of knowledge in Italy which contrasts with what was discussed in the previous chapters. So far, this book has looked at material that arrived in Italy from the West. The main area pertinent to the discussion in this chapter is Crete, where a Jewish community had flourished since the fourteenth century, and which maintained strong relations with Venice, which governed the island. The earliest of the Jews to arrive in Italy from Crete and to play a significant role in Jewish culture there was R. Shemaryah Ikriti. He was a philosophically oriented thinker, active at the court of Robert of Anjou in Naples in the first part of the fourteenth century, and he perhaps had some prophetic and messianic leanings.

Keywords:   trajectory of knowledge, Italy, Crete, R. Shemaryah Ikriti, Robert of Anjou, messianic leanings

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