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Extending the FrontiersEssays on the New Transatlantic Slave Trade Database$
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David Eltis and David Richardson

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780300134360

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300134360.001.0001

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The Suppression of the Slave Trade and Slave Departures from Angola, 1830s–1860s

The Suppression of the Slave Trade and Slave Departures from Angola, 1830s–1860s

Chapter:
(p.313) Chapter 11 The Suppression of the Slave Trade and Slave Departures from Angola, 1830s–1860s
Source:
Extending the Frontiers
Author(s):

Roquinaldo Ferreira

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300134360.003.0011

This chapter outlines the regional variations in Angola, and explores how external and local forces shaped the shipments of slaves between 1830 and 1860. In the early nineteenth century, the introduction of measures to abolish the slave trade changed the dynamic significantly by triggering integration between northern Angola and Luanda. Benguela stood in contrast to the other regions, as it maintained closer ties with Rio de Janeiro than with any other city in the Atlantic world. Recent estimates indicate that Benguela was second only to Luanda in terms of shipments of slaves between 1830 and 1860. The case of the Luandan trade illustrates how another combination of external and local forces shaped the slave trade in Angola. Although shipments of slaves in nineteenth-century Angola were directly affected by external forces, local politics and the supply of slaves were equal key factors in the continuation of the trade during illegality.

Keywords:   regional variations, Angola, slave trade, illegality, Luandan trade, Atlantic world

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