Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Extending the FrontiersEssays on the New Transatlantic Slave Trade Database$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

David Eltis and David Richardson

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780300134360

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300134360.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use (for details see www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 14 November 2018

The Dutch in the Atlantic World: New Perspectives from the Slave Trade with Particular Reference to the African Origins of the Traffic

The Dutch in the Atlantic World: New Perspectives from the Slave Trade with Particular Reference to the African Origins of the Traffic

Chapter:
(p.228) Chapter 8 The Dutch in the Atlantic World: New Perspectives from the Slave Trade with Particular Reference to the African Origins of the Traffic
Source:
Extending the Frontiers
Author(s):

David Eltis

Jelmer Vos

David Richardson

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300134360.003.0008

This chapter examines the concept that along with the post-1710 French traffic, the Dutch slave trade was the first to be documented. Overall, it is estimated that a total volume of 554,300 slaves was carried from the African coast in Dutch vessels in 1596–1829. All slave-trading nations drew on a surprisingly small number of individual ports on the African coast, but the Dutch present the most extreme variant of this pattern. Without the 10,000 or so slaves who the Dutch supplied, the development of the French sugar complex would have been seriously delayed. The Dutch contributed to but did not lead the way in the slave trade's rapid expansion beginning in the middle of the seventeenth century. Before 1650, the Dutch slave trade concentrated almost exclusively on Brazil. Dutch slave traders were far more active in the early French Caribbean but were quickly excluded in 1670.

Keywords:   French traffic, Dutch slave trade, slaves, Dutch vessels, African coast, slave traders

Yale Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.