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Image WarsKings and Commonwealths in England, 1603-1660$
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Kevin Sharpe

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780300162004

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300162004.001.0001

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Depicting Virtue and Majesty

Depicting Virtue and Majesty

Chapter:
(p.190) Chapter 6 Depicting Virtue and Majesty
Source:
Image Wars
Author(s):

Kevin Sharpe

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300162004.003.0007

This chapter describes the virtue and majesty of Charles I in England. The image of Charles has passed into history as a visual representation, of a king powerfully present on the canvases of Anthony van Dyck. There is little evidence of the passion for art that characterized his adulthood in the young Charles, who emulated his brother's interests in exercises and inventions. His sudden interest appears to have been triggered by his inheritance in 1619 of Anna of Denmark's collection, which included the paintings from Henry's galleries. The conjuncture of dynastic succession and artistic bequest may be more significant than has been noted. For Charles, the arts and family were inseparable, and his aesthetic interests were always allied to his dynastic ambitions and beliefs.

Keywords:   Charles I, virtue, majesty, visual representation, painting

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