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Menachem Begin$
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Avi Shilon

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780300162356

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300162356.001.0001

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God, You Have Chosen Us to Rule

God, You Have Chosen Us to Rule

Chapter:
(p.248) Thirteen God, You Have Chosen Us to Rule
Source:
Menachem Begin
Author(s):

Avi Shilon

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300162356.003.0013

In 1976, there was a strong public demand in Israel for a change in government and reforms in the economy and society. These calls led to the establishment of a new party called Dash (Democratic Movement for Change), headed by Yigael Yadin. Dash was denounced by Menachem Begin for the “rudeness of its advertisements.” Ariel Sharon, who was skeptical of Begin's ability to bring about a victory for the Likud, insisted that the party propose a bill to change the political system from a parliamentary to a presidential form of government. Begin rejected Sharon's proposal, prompting the latter to resign and form a new party called Shlomtzion. During the 1977 elections, the political parties relied on advertising agencies for their campaigns. The election results reflected the voters' political disappointment, mostly due to repeated conflicts among politicians such as Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Defense Minister Shimon Peres; alleged corruption in Hamaarach; and the trauma after the war.

Keywords:   elections, Israel, Dash, Menachem Begin, Ariel Sharon, Likud, political parties, Yitzhak Rabin, Hamaarach, corruption

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