Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Just WordsLillian Hellman, Mary McCarthy, and the Failure of Public Conversation in America$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Alan Ackerman

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780300167122

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300167122.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use (for details see http://www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 12 December 2017

Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.293) Conclusion
Source:
Just Words
Author(s):

Alan Ackerman

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300167122.003.0009

This chapter presents concluding remarks on defamation. It discusses the story of James Frey, the self-described drug addict, alcoholic, and criminal, and author of a controversial memoir entitled A Million Little Pieces, who appeared on CNN's Larry King Live to defend his veracity. Frey appeared on the show after The Smoking Gun website alleged that he manipulated details of his life to render himself more compelling as a “tragic victim” and to sweeten the “melodramatic narrative.” The chapter also discusses a story taken from the central chapter of An Unfinished Woman, which focuses on a tragicomic episode known as “the trouble,” which involves the “transshipment of a Russian prostitute.” It also argues that objectivity is something people share by balancing viewpoints, not something pure and independent which they come upon in isolation.

Keywords:   defamation, drug addict, criminal, objectivity, isolation

Yale Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.