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SiberiaA History of the People$
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Janet M Hartley

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780300167948

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300167948.001.0001

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Land, Indigenous Peoples and Communications

Land, Indigenous Peoples and Communications

Chapter:
(p.17) Chapter Two Land, Indigenous Peoples and Communications
Source:
Siberia
Author(s):

Janet M. Hartley

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300167948.003.0002

This chapter looks at the lands of Siberia and the indigenous peoples who were conquered. It also discusses the difficulties of communication over such vast distances and inhospitable lands. Siberia stretches from the Ural mountains to the Pacific Ocean and the Bering Strait in the east, and reaches from north of the Kazakh Steppe to the Arctic Ocean. It covers some 2,900,000 square miles (some 7,500,000 square kilometers), and crosses eight time zones. It comprises 77% of Russian territory and covers some 10% of the Earth's surface. By the end of the seventeenth century, some 100,000 Russians and other “foreigners” had settled in Siberia, but just over twice that number of indigenous peoples already lived in these lands. It is estimated that there are over 500 different tribal groups in Siberia, who between them speak some 120 languages.

Keywords:   Siberia, Siberian history, indigenous peoples, conquest, communication

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