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The Watchful Clothier$
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Matthew Kadane

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780300169614

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300169614.001.0001

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. Mourning, Melancholy, and Money

. Mourning, Melancholy, and Money

Chapter:
(p.133) 6. Mourning, Melancholy, and Money
Source:
The Watchful Clothier
Author(s):

Matthew Kadane

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300169614.003.0006

This chapter discusses how, despite what Ryder took to be the dangers of melancholy, and despite his tacit recognition that mourning and melancholy were not the same, he very particularly and consciously sought to experience a regular state of grief. “I comply with Solomon's assertion. It is better to go to the house of mourning than the house of mirth.” Ryder repeated it almost like a mantra in the journal. Over the course of his examined life, he had visited and recorded the details of hundreds of funerals of strangers, family, and friends. Ryder's religiously sanctioned perpetual and deliberate mourning was already hardly distinguishable from melancholy. What brought on his dejection was the more regular outcome of his watchfulness, namely, his recognition of his capacity to sin. The chapter reveals that much of Ryder's perceived sinfulness stemmed from what he had done during his youth.

Keywords:   melancholy, mourning, Solomon, journal, dejection, sinfulness

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