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MayhemPost-War Crime and Violence in Britain, 1748-53$
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Nicholas Rogers

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780300169621

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300169621.001.0001

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Riots, Revels, and Reprisals

Riots, Revels, and Reprisals

Chapter:
(p.108) 5 Riots, Revels, and Reprisals
Source:
Mayhem
Author(s):

Nicholas Rogers

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300169621.003.0006

This chapter discusses the different aspects of the riots, revels, and reprisals by the servicemen in England. One of the great puzzles of the mid-century crime wave is why it engendered such a panic relative to the dimensions of demobilization. The number of servicemen who were actually demobilized was not especially large, in the region of 80,000 as opposed to 157,000 after the Treaty of Utrecht, 35 years earlier. Part of the reason for the public anxiety in 1748–1753 was the conspicuous reporting of crime in the press. By the mid-century, crime was routinely reported in larger publications, and occasionally triweeklies and weeklies would indulge the public's fascination with the topic by offering open letters on its wider ramifications for governance and the law.

Keywords:   England, crime, riots, reprisals, servicemen

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