Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
MayhemPost-War Crime and Violence in Britain, 1748-53$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Nicholas Rogers

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780300169621

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300169621.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use (for details see http://www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 11 December 2017

Henry Fielding and Social Reform

Henry Fielding and Social Reform

Chapter:
(p.158) 7 Henry Fielding and Social Reform
Source:
Mayhem
Author(s):

Nicholas Rogers

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300169621.003.0008

This chapter elaborates the role of Henry Fielding in social reforms in Britain. Fielding was at the centre of the demobilization crisis of 1748–1753. He became a magistrate first of Westminster and then of Middlesex as the crisis was breaking, and being at the centre of things, briefly in Soho, then at Bow Street, had to deal with much of the fallout. Fielding was troubled by the poor laws, one of the cornerstones of social regulation in eighteenth-century society. He believed that the original intentions of the Elizabethan statutes, which were intended to provide work for the able-bodied and allotted full relief only to the infirm and impotent, had been compromised by administrative indifference, neglect, and misplaced charity.

Keywords:   Britain, Henry Fielding, social reforms, demobilization, magistrate

Yale Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.