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The Science of Human PerfectionHow Genes Became the Heart of American Medicine$
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Nathaniel Comfort

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780300169911

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300169911.001.0001

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Genetics without Sex

Genetics without Sex

Chapter:
(p.200) 7 Genetics without Sex
Source:
The Science of Human Perfection
Author(s):

Nathaniel Comfort

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300169911.003.0007

This chapter explains that genetics without sex needs a sort of experimental synecdoche. In other words, the cells and molecules should come to stand for the entire person. By the middle of the last century, researchers worldwide had developed lineages of human cells on which they could perform a widening range of experimental manipulations that would be ethically unthinkable for human beings. It states that culturing human cells proved to be more difficult than culturing animal cells. Despite being able to culture frog nerve cells in the early 1900s, it wasn't until 1940s when researchers were able to culture human tissues for long enough to be experimentally useful. In the 1950s, researchers were able to simulate the sexual act of exchanging hereditary components among cells.

Keywords:   sex, cells, molecules, genetics, culturing, experimental manipulations

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