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The Marquess of QueensberryWilde's Nemesis$
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Linda Stratmann

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780300173802

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300173802.001.0001

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The Antipathy of Similars

The Antipathy of Similars

Chapter:
(p.149) Chapter 12 The Antipathy of Similars
Source:
The Marquess of Queensberry
Author(s):

Linda Stratmann

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300173802.003.0012

This chapter describes the antipathy of similars faced by Queensberry. The publication of The Picture of Dorian Gray precipitated fresh rumors about Wilde, and very unpleasant stories, which ultimately led to his arrest and downfall, began to be freely circulated in the West End of London. Queensberry's acquaintance John Boon had personally warned two young men, the sons of friends who had become part of Wilde's circle of admirers, of their dangerous situation. Queensberry cannot have been unaware that in a closed, all-male environment, some sexual experimentation may occur between otherwise heterosexual young men. He may have hoped that Bosie's indiscretions were a passing phase which would not recur once his son entered society and met young women, but there must have been fears at the back of his mind that his son was by preference homosexual.

Keywords:   Queensberry, antipathy, West End, heterosexual, homosexual

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