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The Marquess of QueensberryWilde's Nemesis$
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Linda Stratmann

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780300173802

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300173802.001.0001

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An Undercurrent of Eccentricity

An Undercurrent of Eccentricity

Chapter:
(p.107) Chapter 9 An Undercurrent of Eccentricity
Source:
The Marquess of Queensberry
Author(s):

Linda Stratmann

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300173802.003.0009

This chapter discusses the different aspects of Queensberry's eccentric behavior. The public vilification of Queensberry after he declared himself an agnostic destroyed his chances of ever being well thought of in respectable society. A slow, quiet revolution had been taking place in the sport of boxing, and the resurgence of pugilism gave Queensberry another arena, a place where he could meet people who were good company and did not care about his religion or what he thought about marriage. The rules devised for the Queensberry Cups had become as established in the public mind as the Queensberry Rules, and the assurance that a contest was held under those rules was regarded as a stamp of quality, discretion, and respectability. Queensberry and Bosie had been staying with the Dixies, and Beau's lack of prowess on the piano had led to some sarcastic comments by Queensberry and a row.

Keywords:   Queensberry, eccentricity, vilification, boxing, respectable society

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