Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Those Who Write for ImmortalityRomantic Reputations and the Dream of Lasting Fame$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

H. J. Jackson

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780300174793

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300174793.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use (for details see http://www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 12 December 2017

The Stigma of Popularity

The Stigma of Popularity

Chapter:
(p.63) 3 The Stigma of Popularity
Source:
Those Who Write for Immortality
Author(s):

H. J. Jackson

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300174793.003.0003

This chapter discusses the success of the novelists Walter Scott, Jane Austen, and Mary Brunton during the time in the early nineteenth century when people considered novels as low quality art compared to poetry. Scott's novel The Lay of the Last Minstrel, which he had modeled on medieval verse romances, generated nine thousand copies of print in the first two years. Brunton's novel Self-Control quickly gained popularity in London and was published in four editions that appeared in 1811 and in 1812. Austen published fictions that circulated in library market and achieved a measure of recognition before she died. She was described by the scholars as a classic equally successful both in the public and the academy.

Keywords:   Walter Scott, Jane Austen, Mary Brunton, The Lay of the Last Minstrel, Self-Control

Yale Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.