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The Mortgage of the PastReshaping the Ancient Political Inheritance (1050-1300)$
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Francis Oakley

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780300176339

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300176339.001.0001

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Recuperating the Past (i)

Recuperating the Past (i)

Nature and Chronology of the Process

Chapter:
(p.42) 3. Recuperating the Past (i)
Source:
The Mortgage of the Past
Author(s):

Francis Oakley

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300176339.003.0004

This chapter asserts the significance of the attainment of a renewed familiarity with the intellectual legacy of Greek, Roman, and Christian antiquity to the vigorous development of political thinking that took place during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Similarly important was the intellectual stance that medieval thinkers themselves adopted when they sought to come to terms with that legacy. In the study of the political thinking of the era, one must come to terms with both factors and, accordingly, take them into consideration. Although both factors are of equal import, the following sections of the chapter first discuss the second factor—which is the one easily underestimated or often overlooked.

Keywords:   renewed familiarity, intellectual legacy, Greek antiquity, Roman antiquity, Christian antiquity, political thinking, intellectual stance, medieval thinkers

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