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HemlockA Forest Giant on the Edge$

David R. Foster, Anthony D'Amato, and Benjamin Baiser

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780300179385

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300179385.001.0001

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(p.269) References

(p.269) References

Source:
Hemlock
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Yale University Press

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