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Silence Was SalvationChild Survivors of Stalin's Terror and World War II in the Soviet Union$
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Cathy A Frierson

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780300179453

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300179453.001.0001

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“And we began to live there in twenty-six square meters; there were thirteen of us”

“And we began to live there in twenty-six square meters; there were thirteen of us”

Inna Aronovna Shikheeva-Gaister

Moscow

April 19, 2005

Chapter:
(p.37) Chapter Two “And we began to live there in twenty-six square meters; there were thirteen of us”
Source:
Silence Was Salvation
Author(s):

Cathy A. Frierson

, Elena Vetrova
Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300179453.003.0002

This chapter describes the experiences of Inna Aronovna Gaister after her parents were arrested in 1937 during the Great Purge. Inna's parents were Jews who had joined the Bolshevik Party during the civil war. Inna's father was accused of being a member of political opposition, while her mother was sent to Akmolinsk Camp for being “wives of traitors to the motherland.” After their arrest, Inna assumed the responsibility for protecting her two sisters with the help of her nanny. They experienced starvation and disease in World War II. Inna was later arrested as a “child of enemies of the people” in 1949 and exiled to Kazakhstan.

Keywords:   Inna Aronovna Gaister, Great Purge, Bolshevik Party, Akmolinsk Camp, Kazakhstan, World War II

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