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Philosophy of Dreams$
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Christoph Turcke and Susan Gillespie

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780300188400

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300188400.001.0001

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Drives

Drives

Chapter:
(p.85) Chapter Two Drives
Source:
Philosophy of Dreams
Author(s):

Christoph Türcke

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300188400.003.0002

This chapter considers the notion of drive, the urge we have to offset a lack. If a body feels stress from lack of liquid, it results in a drive, or an urgent need to reduce the stress on the body caused by a lack of liquid. Drive is, in other words, the tendency of an organic being towards inertia, or stability. Drive is a desire for rest. All the excitement we experience in life comes from the obstacles that hold back this desire to rest. Drive appears to be a purely physiological-psychological matter. But if we look at the origins of Western philosophy, we can see how powerful this desire for rest is. The chapter looks at the notion of drive through history and philosophy and considers the place it has in our lives. It also considers Freud's notion of the death drive.

Keywords:   stress, stability, inertia, Western philosophy, rest, Freud, death

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