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The Fatal LandWar, Empire, and the Highland Soldier in British America$
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Matthew P Dziennik

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780300196726

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300196726.001.0001

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Land and Interest in the Gaelic Atlantic World

Land and Interest in the Gaelic Atlantic World

Chapter:
(p.155) 5. Land and Interest in the Gaelic Atlantic World
Source:
The Fatal Land
Author(s):

Matthew P. Dziennik

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300196726.003.0005

This chapter examines Highland ideas about land and landownership as well as the overlap between personal interest and the public good. Access to land was the foundation of security in much of the Scottish Highlands. The relative scarcity of fertile and productive land made possession of it essential to economic success. Thus, British possession of North America meant an increased opportunity for individuals and families to pursue land ownership outside the confines of the Highlands. As North American settlement became more and more the focus of Gaelic ideas of material security, so too did the interests of Gaels begin to coincide with those of the imperial state.

Keywords:   Scottish Highlands, landownership, Gaels, North America, imperial state

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