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Yaquis and the EmpireViolence, Spanish Imperial Power, and Native Resilience in Colonial Mexico$
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Raphael B. Folsom

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780300196894

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300196894.001.0001

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A Failed Conquest:

A Failed Conquest:

The Northwest Before the Jesuits, 1500–1591

Chapter:
(p.15) 1 A Failed Conquest
Source:
Yaquis and the Empire
Author(s):

Raphael Brewster Folsom

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300196894.003.0002

This chapter focuses on the optimistic madness of the Spaniards who first tried to conquer northwest Mexico. More specifically, it examines how the Spanish colonizers' brutality brought death and destruction to the region but also planted the seeds of future collaboration. It first considers the wealth and power of the indigenous peoples who flourished in Sinaloa and Sonora. It then explores how mestizo children, people with friends across the cultural divide, and chastened witnesses to frontier violence created a colony that was radically different from that envisioned by the early conquistadors. It also shows that the early years of Spanish colonialism (1500–1591) in northwest Mexico were characterized by chaos, terror, squalor, and, ultimately, failure.

Keywords:   wealth, Mexico, Spanish colonizers, death, power, indigenous peoples, Sinaloa, Sonora, colonialism, terror

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