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The Imprint of Congress$
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David R. Mayhew

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780300215700

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300215700.001.0001

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Depression and the Welfare State

Depression and the Welfare State

Chapter:
(p.54) 4 Depression and the Welfare State
Source:
The Imprint of Congress
Author(s):

David R. Mayhew

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300215700.003.0005

This chapter navigates the 1930s and groups two impulses into it: responding to the Great Depression and building a welfare state equipped with instruments of social provision. Franklin Delano Roosevelt and the Democrats blended these two impulses when they executed their New Deal in the 1930s. However, on current inspection, the blend is confusing and sometimes contradictory, and there is a difference in time span. Responding to the Great Depression was clearly a 1930s drive; whereas the Social Security Act of 1935 still enjoys its high place at the top of the American welfare state. The chapter shows how the timeline on building U.S. social provision runs a lot longer before and afterward.

Keywords:   1930s America, Great Depression, welfare state, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Democrats, 1935 Social Security Act, U.S. social provision

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