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George SantayanaLiterary Philosopher$
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Irving Singer

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780300080377

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300080377.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 14 April 2021

Santayana's Philosophy of Love

Santayana's Philosophy of Love

Chapter:
(p.95) 5 Santayana's Philosophy of Love
Source:
George Santayana
Author(s):

Irving Singer

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300080377.003.0005

This chapter discusses Santayana's thinking about the nature of love, of which no adequate study has been conducted. Speaking of Santayana as a twentieth-century Platonist, the chapter tries to show how Santayana used his Platonism to oppose the type of materialism that Freud represents. It would have been equally valid to have started with Santayana's own materialism as the basis of his philosophy. In his speculations on love, scattered through all his books, that is how Santayana usually begins his analysis. This materialistic strand establishes Santayana as a direct descendent of Schopenhauer. Over and beyond Santayana's materialism and Platonism, the chapter also detects a humanistic voice that differs from both of them. The chapter further contends that Santayana's humanism is the most promising element in his approach.

Keywords:   nature of love, Platonism, materialism, Freud, Schopenhauer, humanism

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