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Meselson, Stahl, and the Replication of DNAA History of "The Most Beautiful Experiment in Biology"$
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Frederic Lawrence Holmes

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780300085402

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300085402.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 25 September 2021

Working at High Speed

Working at High Speed

Chapter:
(p.215) Chapter Seven Working at High Speed
Source:
Meselson, Stahl, and the Replication of DNA
Author(s):

Frederic Lawrence Holmes

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300085402.003.0008

This chapter focuses on Robert Sinsheimer's intention to remind his colleagues that their “hard-won recognition of the role of DNA” had brought them only to the beginning of a “new era in genetics and biochemistry.” It begins with a special lecture entitled “First Steps Toward a Genetic Chemistry” that Sinsheimer delivered at the dedication of the Church Laboratory in November 1956. Sinsheimer spoke as a member of the network surrounding Delbruck but one who stood somewhat apart from the enthusiasms of the phage group. Meselson and Stahl were present for the Church Laboratory celebrations and may have heard Sinsheimer's lecture, but his comments about the replication of DNA apparently did not lead to any discussions with them about their plans to test the various proposals for “accomplishing this feat.”

Keywords:   role of DNA, Robert Sinsheimer, genetics, biochemistry, Church Laboratory, Delbruck, phage group, replication of DNA

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