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Smiling Through the Cultural CatastropheToward the Revival of Higher Education$
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Jeffrey Hart

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780300087048

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300087048.001.0001

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Hamlet in St. Petersburg, Faust in Great Neck: Dostoyevsky and Scott Fitzgerald

Hamlet in St. Petersburg, Faust in Great Neck: Dostoyevsky and Scott Fitzgerald

Chapter:
(p.207) Chapter Ten Hamlet in St. Petersburg, Faust in Great Neck: Dostoyevsky and Scott Fitzgerald
Source:
Smiling Through the Cultural Catastrophe
Author(s):

Jeffrey Hart

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300087048.003.0010

This chapter first looks at the novel as the epic, noting differences between the two concepts such as: the novel fundamentally “shows” a story rather than “tells” it. Unlike the literature of the past, the novel also is not dependent upon a well-known story such as those found in myth, legend, or the Bible. Although allusions to them surface, the main purpose and reality of the novel is what the five senses disclose about reality. This chapter looks at two novels that illustrate various aspects about the novel, and how these particular novels explore the concepts behind John Locke's theory of knowledge. It studies Fyodor Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment as well as F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby.

Keywords:   novel, reality of the novel, John Locke, theory of knowledge, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment, F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

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