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Friends Hold All Things in CommonTradition, Intellectual Property, and the Adages of Erasmus$
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Kathy Eden

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780300087574

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300087574.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 16 June 2021

What Do a Spoiled Egyptian, a Captive Woman, and a Pythagorean Have in Common?: Erasmus on Tradition

What Do a Spoiled Egyptian, a Captive Woman, and a Pythagorean Have in Common?: Erasmus on Tradition

Chapter:
(p.8) 1 What Do a Spoiled Egyptian, a Captive Woman, and a Pythagorean Have in Common?: Erasmus on Tradition
Source:
Friends Hold All Things in Common
Author(s):

Kathy Eden

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300087574.003.0002

This chapter discusses Erasmus's most famous protreptic, the Paraclesis, which not only issues a call to the philosophy of Christ but does so with the help of some of the same pagan philosophers summoned in the adage. Not only do the teachings of some pagan philosophers coincide with Christian doctrine, but also their ancient wisdom, like passages of Scripture, can inspire exegetical activity conducive to pious living. Closely associated with his philological efforts to improve both the Greek text of the New Testament and its Latin translation, Erasmus's program for cooperation between pagan and Christian antiquity encounters steady resistance within the Church. On the other hand, his sermon-like essays based on worldly learning enjoyed enormous popularity, both individually and as part of the collection of roughly 4,000 proverbs called the Adagiorum chiliades.

Keywords:   most famous protreptic, Paraclesis, philosophy of Christ, pagan philosophers, Christian doctrine, Scripture, exegetical activity

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