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Engaging the Moving Image$
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Noël Carroll

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780300091953

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300091953.001.0001

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TV and Film: A Philosophical Perspective

TV and Film: A Philosophical Perspective

Chapter:
(p.265) Chapter 13 TV and Film: A Philosophical Perspective
Source:
Engaging the Moving Image
Author(s):

Noël Carroll

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300091953.003.0013

This chapter shows how critics often challenged the artistic credentials of film by alleging that it was nothing more than “canned theater”—not an autonomous artform, but merely surrogate theater served up in celluloid. As a result, film theorists spilled a great deal of ink trying to prove that the medium of film is essentially different from that of theater and that, in consequence, the possibility that film could be an artform—with equal standing as regards not only theater, but with respect, as well, to its other five sister arts—had to be acknowledged. Undoubtedly, this theoretical debate was underwritten by the fact that film and theater were economic competitors for the same audiences. Whatever its material motivation, however, the debate was conducted in the philosophical idiom of essential differentiae rather than in terms of more lowly considerations, such as product differentiation.

Keywords:   critics, theater, TV

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