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Edmund Husserl and Eugen FinkBeginnings and Ends in Phenomenology, 1928-1938$
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Ronald Bruzina

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780300092097

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300092097.001.0001

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Orientation I: Phenomenology Beyond the Preliminary

Orientation I: Phenomenology Beyond the Preliminary

Chapter:
(p.73) 2 Orientation I: Phenomenology Beyond the Preliminary
Source:
Edmund Husserl and Eugen Fink
Author(s):

Ronald Bruzina

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300092097.003.0002

This chapter describes how Eugen Fink learned from Husserl himself. Unlike those of us today who wish to study the philosophy of Edmund Husserl, Fink did not gain his understanding of phenomenology primarily from texts. Whereas we are faced with the massive collection of manuscripts in the Husserl Archives at Louvain and the continuing publication of selections from them in the Husserliana series, Fink listened to Husserl himself, spoke with him, thought with him. It was not the written line of what Plato called “dead discourse” but “the living speech” of Husserl's own teaching that he followed. Even Husserl's offerings were never analyses of writings; his thought was always focused on issues and problems in the matters at hand, not on the wording of texts.

Keywords:   manuscripts, Husserl Archives, Louvain, Husserliana series, dead discourse, speech

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