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The Beecher Sisters$
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Barbara A. White

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780300099270

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300099270.001.0001

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Free Love and “Mrs. Satan,” 1871–1872

Free Love and “Mrs. Satan,” 1871–1872

Chapter:
(p.179) 8 Free Love and “Mrs. Satan,” 1871–1872
Source:
The Beecher Sisters
Author(s):

Barbara A. White

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300099270.003.0008

This chapter describes the Beecher sisters and their influence on National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA) conventions. Isabella had suspected the situation that led most directly to the NWSA's separation from Woodhull and the influence of certain men on her ideas and behavior. She wrote to Mary Livermore that some man or men might be using Woodhull for their own purposes. At the time of the convention in January 1871, the NWSA women naturally thought Woodhull had composed her own memorial, but it was gradually coming out that Benjamin Butler had probably written it. The NWSA also intended to hold a May meeting in New York and, although Isabella had given up hope of uniting the two rival suffrage organizations permanently, she wanted to see a joint convention in order to avoid four dribbling suffrage days instead of two strong ones.

Keywords:   Beecher sisters, NWSA, Isabella Beecher, Woodhull, suffrage organization

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