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After the FiresThe Ecology of Change in Yellowstone National Park$
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Linda L. Wallace

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780300100488

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300100488.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 06 August 2020

Stream Ecosystem Responses to Fire: The First Ten Years

Stream Ecosystem Responses to Fire: The First Ten Years

Chapter:
(p.165) Chapter 8 Stream Ecosystem Responses to Fire: The First Ten Years
Source:
After the Fires
Author(s):

G. Wayne Minshall

Todd V. Royer

Christopher T. Robinson

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300100488.003.0008

This chapter describes stream ecosystem responses to fire. The fundamental importance of disturbance in stream ecosystem dynamics and, in particular, of maintaining a heterogeneous or patchy habitat templet in both space and time is widely accepted. The findings demonstrate an integral relationship over time between a stream and its catchment following such large-scale disturbances as wildfire. Individual streams varied considerably in the magnitude and timing of response depending on such factors as stream size, proportion of the catchment burned, and localized differences in precipitation, geology, and topography. Temporally, major physical changes in streams that occurred from 1995 to 1997 were especially noteworthy. The physical environment of streams in some burned watersheds, such as parts of Cache Creek, changed more in those three years than in the first six post-fire years.

Keywords:   stream ecosystem, stream size, geology, topography, catchment

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