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The Bourgeois FrontierFrench Towns, French Traders, and American Expansion$
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Jay Gitlin

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780300101188

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300101188.001.0001

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“We are well off that there are no Virginians in this quarter”: The Two Wests from 1763 to 1803

“We are well off that there are no Virginians in this quarter”: The Two Wests from 1763 to 1803

Chapter:
(p.26) 2 “We are well off that there are no Virginians in this quarter”: The Two Wests from 1763 to 1803
Source:
The Bourgeois Frontier
Author(s):

Jay Gitlin

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300101188.003.0003

Just as the French empire in North America came to an end, St. Louis rapidly grew from being a new French settlement into a boomtown. The so-called “interior French” not only endured, but prospered after 1763, contrary to what historian Francis Parkman suggested in connection with the French colonial enterprise in North America. St. Louis provided an alternate market for furs and a new source of goods through New Orleans. Goods, capital, and enterprising merchants began to flow into what is known as a new Creole Corridor via two viable avenues of trade: the Great Lakes route and the Mississippi route. One place that grew and prospered during the turbulent decades of the 1760s and 1770s was Prairie du Chien, located at the junction of the Mississippi and Wisconsin rivers in present-day Wisconsin. As a result of the Seven Years War, Spain took over Louisiana while Britain gained jurisdiction over Canada, as well as over the French villages in the present-day states of Illinois and Indiana.

Keywords:   trade, North America, St. Louis, interior French, New Orleans, Creole Corridor, Prairie du Chien, Seven Years War, Spain, Britain

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