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The Chattel PrincipleInternal Slave Trades in the Americas$
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Walter Johnson

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780300103557

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300103557.001.0001

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Another Middle Passage?

Another Middle Passage?

The Internal Slave Trade in Brazil

Chapter:
(p.291) 13 Another Middle Passage?
Source:
The Chattel Principle
Author(s):

Richard Graham

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300103557.003.0013

This chapter tells the story of how Brazil imported more slaves from Africa than any other country. In fact, slavery persisted in Brazil until 1888, long after it had been abolished elsewhere in the Americas. Its experience differed from that of other slaveholding countries in other ways as well and certainly differed in the course of its internal slave trade. The first half of this chapter examines how many slaves were involved in the Brazilian trade, who was traded, where they came from, and where they went. Such an approach is useful as far as it goes because it suggests patterns not necessarily visible at the time. The chapter poses the truly important question: What did the slave trade mean for the human beings who were traded?

Keywords:   slavery, Brazil, Africa, slaveholding countries, internal slave trade, Brazilian trade

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