Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Chattel PrincipleInternal Slave Trades in the Americas$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Walter Johnson

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780300103557

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300103557.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 18 September 2019

Slave Resistance, Coffles, and the Debates over Slavery in the Nation's Capital

Slave Resistance, Coffles, and the Debates over Slavery in the Nation's Capital

Chapter:
(p.72) 4 Slave Resistance, Coffles, and the Debates over Slavery in the Nation's Capital
Source:
The Chattel Principle
Author(s):

Robert H. Gudmestad

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300103557.003.0004

This chapter describes and examines the events in George Miller's tavern, a seedy establishment notorious in the state of Washington for being a slave depot. A woman, known only as Anna, jumped because a slave trader purchased her and two of her children but declined to take their siblings and father. The price she paid for her impulsive action was a broken back and two shattered arms. When news of the incident reached the House of Representatives, John Randolph blasted the inhuman sale of slaves carried on in the district. In so doing, he cast doubt on the efficacy of the interstate slave trade by closely linking it to abhorrent activities and results. It was the first direct denunciation of the interstate slave trade in Congress. Randolph pointed a finger of scorn toward an issue that most others would rather avoid or ignore.

Keywords:   slave depot, George Miller's tavern, Washington, Anna, slave trader, John Randolph, inhuman sale

Yale Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.