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George Sand$
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Elizabeth Harlan

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780300104172

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300104172.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 02 August 2021

A Daughter Is Born

A Daughter Is Born

Chapter:
(p.151) Chapter Fifteen A Daughter Is Born
Source:
George Sand
Author(s):

Elizabeth Harlan

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300104172.003.0016

This chapter discusses Sand's ambivalence toward her daughter, which began even before Solange was born. The pregnancy was difficult; by April, Aurore had gained too much weight and was suffering from minor complications. By the time she wrote her autobiography, Sand had concocted a full-blown cover-up to distract from Solange's illicit birth: “I was afraid my daughter might not live since she was born prematurely as the result of a fright,” says Sand. In fact, Solange was born large and well-formed and, by all indications, at full term. The day after Solange's birth, Sand reports that she overheard her husband making love to the Spanish maid Pepita in the room next door. However, in the absence of any acknowledgment by Sand that she had also cheated on her husband, the chronological juxtaposition of these two events—Solange's birth and Casimir's conspicuous betrayal—seems contrived.

Keywords:   ambivalence, Solange, illicit birth, Pepita, chronological juxtaposition, Solange's birth, Casimir's conspicuous betrayal

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