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George Sand$
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Elizabeth Harlan

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780300104172

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300104172.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 30 November 2021

Her Father's Daughter

Her Father's Daughter

Chapter:
(p.3) Chapter One Her Father's Daughter
Source:
George Sand
Author(s):

Elizabeth Harlan

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300104172.003.0002

This chapter focuses on George Sand's coming into the world and her unwavering desire to resolve the conflict into which she was born. Whatever the particulars of her birth may have been, her father Maurice Dupin occupied its foreground—playing his cherished violin. Although Maurice Dupin had served as an officer in Napoleon's army, throughout her autobiography Sand emphasizes Maurice's love of music more than his love for the martial arts. In the end, it was not her father's military prowess but his creative sensibility that constituted Sand's self-designated legacy from him. Her mother Sophie Delaborde Dupin, on the other hand, occupied a position on the sidelines, with Sand underscoring Sophie's role in her birth. Sand depicts herself as being the one who spared her mother a long and difficult labor, who relieved her of the pain of childbirth, who brought her happiness.

Keywords:   conflict, Maurice Dupin, violin, Napoleon's army, military, creative sensibility, Sophie Delaborde Dupin

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