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Jazz in Search of Itself$
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Larry Kart

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780300104202

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300104202.001.0001

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Notes and Memories of the New Music, 1969

Notes and Memories of the New Music, 1969

Chapter:
(p.17) Part I Notes and Memories of the New Music, 1969
Source:
Jazz in Search of Itself
Author(s):

Larry Kart

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300104202.003.0002

This chapter describes how the author came to know jazz music and found other individuals who shared his interest in it. It explores the evolution of jazz in a period of musical consolidation, heralded by John Coltrane's Blue Train album. At about the same time, the author heard Chico Hamilton's quintet, and, amid the polite thumping, the group's reedman, Eric Dolphy on bass clarinet, picked up a strange-looking ebony horn and played a solo that sounded like Coltrane translated for the human voice. This is considered the author's second point of reference for his belief that change was occurring. Ornette Coleman was the third, although the author faced difficulty in understanding Something Else at first. This record is a perfect example of Coleman's distance from the conventions of the 1940s and 1950s.

Keywords:   jazz music, evolution of jazz, musical consolidation, John Coltrane, Ornette Coleman, Eric Dolphy

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