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Stress and HypertensionExamining the Relation between Psychological Stress and High Blood Pressure$
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Kevin T. Larkin

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780300106442

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300106442.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 27 November 2021

Conclusions and Future Directions

Conclusions and Future Directions

Chapter:
(p.307) 9 Conclusions and Future Directions
Source:
Stress and Hypertension
Author(s):

Kevin T. Larkin

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300106442.003.0010

The evidence presented and examined in this book supported the link between stress and essential hypertension. Thousands of studies using a variety of methods for measuring stress and blood pressure have revealed an association across numerous populations from different countries. This concluding chapter provides a summary of the major findings presented in the book. It also considers a few areas in which future empirical work looks promising: comprehensive measurement of blood pressure regulation; broader application of ambulatory measurement of blood pressure; consideration of hemodynamic parameters; testing models of allostatic overload; use of objective psychological measures; and use of individualized patient assessment in optimizing treatment outcome.

Keywords:   stress, essential hypertension, blood pressure, ambulatory measurement, hemodynamic parameters, allostatic overload

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