Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Conquest of MalariaItaly, 1900-1962$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Frank M. Snowden

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780300108996

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300108996.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 23 October 2019

Fighting Disaster: DDT and Old Weapons

Fighting Disaster: DDT and Old Weapons

Chapter:
(p.198) 8 Fighting Disaster: DDT and Old Weapons
Source:
The Conquest of Malaria
Author(s):

Frank M. Snowden

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300108996.003.0009

This chapter discusses a new stage in the world history of malaria began in the midst of the emergency that had engulfed the Pontine Marshes. In June 1945, Alberto Missiroli announced in a speech to the Provincial Antimalarial Committee (CPA), over which he presided, the availability of the new and magic weapon of DDT (dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane). It was so powerful that he predicted to a dubious audience that within five years malaria would be vanquished both locally in Littoria and throughout Italy. In this unexpected declaration, Missiroli had proclaimed the beginning of a new era in malariology that was to last for a generation. It was characterized by American dominance, euphoric optimism, and reliance on DDT to slay the hydra of malaria.

Keywords:   world history, malaria, Pontine Marshes, Alberto Missiroli, Provincial Antimalarial Committee, CPA, magic weapon, DDT, dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane, malariology

Yale Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.