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The Making of John LedyardEmpire and Ambition in the Life of an Early American Traveler$
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Edward G. Gray

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780300110555

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300110555.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

On Stage at Dartmouth College

On Stage at Dartmouth College

Chapter:
(p.23) Chapter II On Stage at Dartmouth College
Source:
The Making of John Ledyard
Author(s):

Edward G. Gray

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300110555.003.0003

This chapter discusses John Ledyard's period at Dartmouth College. On several occasions during the months he spent at Dartmouth, Ledyard performed the most popular tragedy of his age, Joseph Addison's Cato. After about four months at Dartmouth, Ledyard left the college for Indian country. The chapter discusses how he may have traveled north and west to the trading villages that dotted the Lake Champlain basin; or that he perhaps went west into Mohawk country. But the college ledger indicates that Ledyard did leave, since there are no debits or credits in his name from late August 1772 through the first of December of that year. The chapter reveals that he returned to Dartmouth at the beginning of December 1772. Sometime in late 1773 or early 1774, as New England remained embroiled in controversy over the hated tea tax, Ledyard returned to Groton, where his father's name was still familiar among merchants and sea captains.

Keywords:   Dartmouth College, Mohawk country, college ledger, New England, tea tax

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