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Singing for FreedomThe Hutchinson Family Singers and the Nineteenth-Century Culture of Reform$
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Scott Gac

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780300111989

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300111989.001.0001

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Manufactured Nature

Manufactured Nature

Chapter:
Manufactured Nature
Source:
Singing for Freedom
Author(s):

Scott Gac

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300111989.003.0010

This chapter examines Milford as one of the many burgeoning manufacturing towns in the northern countryside. The opening of large manufacturing towns such as Lowell drew migrants from the countryside who was no longer tied to family land. Geographic mobility and jobs away from home provided a degree of economic and social independence previously unknown to young men and, especially, to young women. New hotels and well-groomed roads certainly changed the way the White Mountains looked, but the traffic required to fill the accommodations and the railroads that brought visitors to the region made the most dramatic difference. By the start of 1840, the Hutchinson family's hop cultivation, along with successful business ventures of some of the older brothers in Lynn and in Boston, provided Jesse and Polly with financial stability despite the 1837 depression.

Keywords:   Milford, manufacturing towns, geographic mobility, hotels, roads, traffic, financial stability

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