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Mortgaging the AncestorsIdeologies of Attachment in Africa$
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Parker Shipton

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780300116021

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300116021.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 27 September 2021

The Thin End

The Thin End

Land and Credit in the Colonial Period

Chapter:
(p.130) Chapter 6 The Thin End
Source:
Mortgaging the Ancestors
Author(s):

Parker Shipton

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300116021.003.0006

This chapter offers a glimpse into the formation of the process of individualizing or privatizing landholding in Africa, particularly Kenya, due to the fact that it is through Kenya's experience that we can study what can go right and wrong in the process, or how the experience can feel. This chapter then looks deeper into the formation of that process, and makes suggestions as to what part those affected did or did not play in it. Kenya attempted to title land as individual or private property in Africa south of the Sahara. In fact it was the first country to attempt this nationwide. Liberia made three attempts to set up land adjudication programs, and under the Glen Grey Act of 1894, in the Union of South Africa, titling was extended over parts of the Transkei. The rest of tropical Africa, however, had to wait until the late nineteenth-century scramble to begin their titling programs.

Keywords:   privatizing landholding, private property, Liberia, land adjudication programs, Glen Grey Act of 1894, Union of South Africa, titling, Transkei, nineteenth-century scramble

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