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Worlds Apart?Disability and Foreign Language Learning$
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Tammy Berberi, Elizabeth C. Hamilton, and Ian Sutherland

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780300116304

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300116304.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 03 August 2021

Incorporating Foreign Sign Language in Foreign Language Instruction for Deaf Students: Cultural and Methodological Rationale

Incorporating Foreign Sign Language in Foreign Language Instruction for Deaf Students: Cultural and Methodological Rationale

Chapter:
(p.137) Chapter 7 Incorporating Foreign Sign Language in Foreign Language Instruction for Deaf Students: Cultural and Methodological Rationale
Source:
Worlds Apart?
Author(s):

Pilar Piñar

Donalda Ammons

Facundo Montenegro

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300116304.003.0007

This chapter discusses the methodological advantages of incorporating foreign sign language into the instruction of written foreign languages for Deaf students. The case study is a Spanish reading program for beginners, specifically designed for American Deaf students, which combines written Spanish and Costa Rican Sign Language through the use of video and caption technology. The program consists of a video containing ten Costa Rican legends narrated in Costa Rican Sign Language and captioned in Spanish. The videotape is coordinated with a booklet containing written Spanish versions of the same stories that appear on the video. The written stories range from the basic to the basic-intermediate level of Spanish, and they feature many of the key grammatical structures that are typically covered in a first-year Spanish course, such as regular and irregular verbs in the present tense or the preterit and the imperfect.

Keywords:   foreign sign language, foreign languages, Deaf students, Spanish reading program, Spanish sign language, Costa Rican sign language

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