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Hollow JusticeA History of Indigenous Claims in the United States$
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David E. Wilkins

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780300119268

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300119268.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 14 April 2021

. The Resurgence of Eastern Natives

. The Resurgence of Eastern Natives

The Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act of 1980

Chapter:
(p.126) 6. The Resurgence of Eastern Natives
Source:
Hollow Justice
Author(s):

David E. Wilkins

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300119268.003.0006

Prior to the 1970s, most Native nations living east of the Mississippi were virtually ignored by federal officials, state governments, and most non-Indians. This chapter looks at how this changed in 1975 when an important federal appellate case—Joint Tribal Council of the Passamaquoddy Tribe et al. v. Morton et al.—was handed down. The claims of these indigenous peoples had not been served by the Indian Claims Commission because their land losses had occurred not because of federal action but as a result of actions by individual states, cities, or individuals. This case had a profound impact on events.

Keywords:   Native nations, federal officials, non-Indians, Joint Tribal Council, Passamaquoddy Tribe, Indian Claims Commission

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