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Theodore RooseveltPreacher of Righteousness$
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Joshua David Hawley

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780300120103

Published to Yale Scholarship Online: October 2013

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300120103.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM YALE SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.yale.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Yale University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in YSO for personal use.date: 16 October 2019

Battle for the Lord

Battle for the Lord

Chapter:
(p.207) 11 Battle for the Lord
Source:
Theodore Roosevelt
Author(s):

Joshua David Hawley

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300120103.003.0011

Hoping to regain control of the Republican Party and, with it, the progressive moment, Theodore Roosevelt announced that he would challenge William Howard Taft for the Republican presidential nomination in 1912. He won 278 delegates through the party primaries, more than three-quarters of the total available, but Taft captured the great majority of the 700 votes chosen in districts and state party conventions. Roosevelt accused Taft of stealing the nomination and decided to form his own party, which he called the Progressive Party. In contrast to Roosevelt's republican, nationalist agenda, Woodrow Wilson, another candidate for the presidential election of 1912, was elaborating an alternative, distinctly liberal rationale for activist government. Wilson questioned the viability of Roosevelt's politics that endorsed a corporate morality as intrinsic to corporate freedom. Wilson would go on to win the election.

Keywords:   Roosevelt's politics, Republican Party, Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, presidential nomination, primaries, Progressive Party, Woodrow Wilson, presidential election, morality

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